Dr. Paul A. Craig
Professor of Education
Aerospace Department
Middle Tennessee State University

PUBLICATIONS

Publications by McGraw-Hill


Pilot in Command


The Killing Zone


Multiengine Flying


Light Airplane Navigation Essentials


Controlling Pilot Error


Be a Better Pilot


Stalls and Spins

Barnes & Noble.com - www.bn.com

Barnes & Noble Online

 


Access to Flight Syllabus


Access To Flight Textbook


ASA
Online

Amazon.com
amazon.com

 

Recent Publications

Recent Publ
Title: Scenario-Based Private/Instrument Syllabus v. Traditional Maneuver-Based Syllabi: A Preliminary Descriptive Analysis

Abstract: 

The Aerospace Department at Middle Tennessee State University and the NASA Langley Research Center entered into a cooperative agreement in 2003. The project is named the SATS Aerospace Flight Education Research (SAFER) and is part of NASA’s Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) initiative. The SATS project envisions a future flight environment that employs light aircraft to
transport people and cargo from point to point using small, under utilized airports, instead of the major gridlocked airports. The aircraft used in the SATS vision would take advantage of a range of emerging technologies including glass cockpits, new structures, and new engines. But with the understanding that the best aircraft and the best systems are still only as good as its operator, MTSU Aerospace set out to explore how pilot training might be different in the SATS environment. The SAFER project therefore takes beginner pilots and completes their initial Visual Flight (VFR) and Instrument Flight (IFR) flight training in technically advanced aircraft to determine how best to educate the next generation of pilots in the next generation of aircraft. The availability of information from an automated flight deck can be easily adapted to scenario-based training, so the SAFER researchers decided to incorporate scenario, rather than strictly maneuver-based training as the core of the training syllabus. This approach instantly begs the question: If you train using a scenario-based method, will the students also develop the “stick and rudder” skills that are also so important for pilots to master? The early results from the SAFER project indicate that piloting skills (stick and rudder) are being mastered despite the scenario-based method, and that decision making skills are being increased.

Co-Authors:  Paul A. Craig, John E. Bertrand, Wayne Dornan, Steve Gossett, Kimberly K. Thorsby

NOTE:  Full paper listed below (Collegiate Aviation Review, 2005)


Title:  Best Evidence for the FAA Industry Training Standards (FITS) Program for Piloting Training in Technically Advanced Aircraft

Abstract:

Until very recently, issues with automated flight decks were only relevant to the commercial air carrier industry (1, 2, and 3). This is no longer the case, however, with the advent of automated cockpits that have recently proliferated in the General Aviation (GA) community.  An automated aircraft is generally comprised of an integrated cockpit system consisting of a primary flight display, a multifunction display which includes a Global Positioning System (GPS) with traffic and terrain graphics, along with a fully integrated autopilot (1).  In the GA community this type of aircraft which requires the pilot to interface with at least one computer is collectively known as a Technically Advanced Aircraft (TAA). It includes aircraft used in both VFR and IFR operations, with equipment certified to either VFR or IFR standards (1, 2).   The results of this study were presented in preliminary form at the National Aircraft Training Symposium in Daytona Beach, Florida.  March, 2006, and the International Symposium on Aviation Psychology, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, April,2004.

Co-Authors: 
Wayne A. Dornan, Paul Craig, Steve Gossett, Wendy Beckman

NOTE:  Full paper listed below (Collegiate Aviation Review, 2006)


Title:  Ab initio Training in the Glass Cockpit Era:  New Technology Meets New Pilots

Abstract:

The Aerospace Department at Middle Tennessee State University and the NASA Langley Research Center entered into a cooperative agreement in 2003. The project is named the SATS Aerospace Flight Education Research (SAFER) and is part of NASA’s Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) initiative. The SATS project envisions a future flight environment that employs small aircraft to transport people and cargo from point to point using smaller, under utilized airports instead of major gridlocked airports. The aircraft used in the SATS vision would take advantage of a range on emerging technologies including glass cockpits, new structures, and new engines. But with the understanding that the best aircraft and the best systems are still only as good as its operator, MTSU Aerospace set out to explore how pilot training might be different in the SATS environment. The SAFER project therefore takes beginner pilots and completes their initial Visual Flight (VFR) and Instrument Flight (IFR) flight training in technically advanced aircraft to determine how best to educate the next generation of pilots in the next generation of aircraft.

Co-Authors:  Paul A. Craig, John E. Bertrand, Wayne Dornan, Steve Gossett, Kimberly K. Thorsby

NOTE:  Full paper listed below (International Symposium on Aviation Psychology, 2005)


Interactive Pilot (iPilot.com) is an online aviation magazine.  Select the link below to view over 150 articles that have appeared on the iPilot web site.


Collegiate Aviation Review 2005

Collegiate Aviation Review 2006

International Symposium on Aviation Psychology 2005


Interactive Pilot (iPilot.com)

 

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